Silhouette Illusion

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People flock to this illusion as it supposedly tells us which side of our brain we use more depending on which direction we see the girl spinning. But psychologists have declared that the illusion has nothing to do with personality or brain sides, it’s more dependent on vision. If you look at the girl with a view from above. She is going counter-clockwise. With a view from below. She is going clockwise. Most people eventually do see the dancer spinning in both directions.

The Checkered Shadow

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This optical illusion seems to be one of the most popular illusions despite it being debunked several times. Tiles ‘A’ and ‘B’ are the same color even though one seems darker. The explanation is pretty simple as it involves the way our eyes process shadows and soft lines. Our eyes will directly go to the sharper lines, which is why the в tile seems lighter.

The Oregon Vortex

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For years, the Oregon vortex located in Gold Hill, Oregon was thought to be the center point of paranormal phenomenon that includes people changing sizes, brooms standing up, and balls rolling uphill. But Syfy’s “fact or faked: the paranormal files” took a trip to the vortex and found it was nothing more than optical illusions based on slanted angles and uneven construction that plays tricks on the eye and makes visitors feel disoriented. So next time you visit, check out the lines and angles that are meant to trick your brain into thinking something else.

Floating Man

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This image and many others like it, go viral a few times every year. Initially, people think it’s a magic trick or even photo editing that makes it seem like the subject is floating. In reality, all you need is a dark shadow that looks similar to the subject placed next to them, and anyone can look like they’re floating in mid-air.

Rotating Snakes

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The Rotating Snakes is one of the most popular optical illusions that looks like a still image is moving before our very eyes. This illusion mainly uses concentric shapes and our eyes have been trained to see these shapes as constantly moving. In other words, this illusion is messing with our minds on purpose. If you blink, the wheels move quicker. If you fixate on a spot, the circles stop.

The Dress

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The Dress controversy nearly broke the internet as well as friendships and even marriages. Was the dress blue and black or white and gold? How is it that people could see two different sets of colors? The argument was settled once photographers and psychologists stepped in to explain that the reason why the dress looks different to so many people is because of how their eyes register light. The eye is trained to automatically rule out light and how the brain interprets color. So no, the dress isn’t cursed.

Child Mummy

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The corpse of Rosalia Lombardo has been the center of an optical illusion debate for years. In 1920, the two-year-old Italian girl died of pneumonia. Depending on which angle you are looking from. It looks like her eyes are opening and closing; but it’s all an optical illusion that is related to angles, light, and glass.

Hering Illusion

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This optical illusion was created by a german physiologist named Ewald Hering. Actually, scientists use this illusion to study the human brain and perception. Initially, it seems that the two red lines are curved, but they are actually straight. It’s not a magic trick, just a trick of the eye thanks to the black lines in the background, distorting the look of the red ones.

Zollner Illusion

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Believe it or not, the long lines seen here are parallel to each other. They may look crooked, but this illusion is playing on your perception of angles. The shorter lines and their change in direction, is making our brain think that the long lines are uneven.