Everyone loves a good mystery, but sometimes figuring out a mystery can be a challenge. Sometimes there are occurrences that just have no explanation. Here are seven creepy mysteries that science can’t explain.

Giant Stone Spheres

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In Costa Rica on the islands of Isla del Cano and Diquis Delta, there are over three hundred circular objects of varying sizes. Known to the locals as Las Bolas, literally translating to ‘the balls’, these spheres have also been called the Diquis Spheres. These nearly perfect round stones range in size and can weigh up to sixteen tons each. Almost all of them seem to be made of granodiorite, but others are limestone or sandstone. And no one really knows where they came from. There are myths that the stones originated from Atlantis, the fabled sunken city, and that they were created by a long-forgotten society. The stones have been studied for years, but the only sure thing is that they are thousands of years old.

The Hum

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In the town of Taos, new Mexico residents were baffled when many began to hear a low-frequency hum in the 1990s. Described as a Hum, buzz, and even whir, the annoying sound began to puzzle and frustrate the 2% of the population that could hear it. Despite researchers looking into the phenomenon, they could not pinpoint the sound’s origin. Some began to believe it was caused by hysteria, suggesting that those hearing the sound only heard it because they thought they could rather than there being an actual sound, while others thought it was caused by unusual acoustics. The hum has also been heard in other areas of the United states, Canada, the United Kingdom and Australia.

Walking Rocks

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Referred to as sailing stones or walking rocks, these stones appear to move on their own, even leaving a dragging trail in their wake. Researchers have tried to explain these strange occurrences in racetrack playa, California since the early 1900s. Time-lapse footage taken of the rocks showed them moving at a considerable speed so many scientists and researchers believe that the movement is caused by the rocks sliding over thin sheets of ice that form overnight and melt during the day. But there are others that disagree. While some believe this mystery has been solved, there are many that believe further study is required.

Fairy Rings

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There are many stories concerning fairy rings, otherwise known as elf or pixie rings. These mysterious rings of mushroom appear in grasslands and forested areas. They form a nearly perfect circle of fungus and have been considered by the superstitious to be dangerous places where worlds collide. In many folklore tales, fairy circles are the result of elves and fairies dancing. It was said that their dancing burned the ground and caused the rapid growth of the mushrooms. Folklore warns that destroying or entering a fairy circle causes bad luck and misfortune. Folklore aside, researchers have yet to discover the cause of this strange phenomenon.

The Baigong Pipes

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On top of Mount Baigong in China, something strange was found by American scientists in the early 2000s. Pipes, ranging in size from the diameter of a toothpick to very large, were discovered in an uninhabited area buried deep within the ancient rock. They were made of 30% silicon dioxide, calcium oxide and iron, but are believed to be centuries old researchers have said that in order to create the pipes, whoever made them would have needed an advanced drilling system that would not have been possible at the time. Chinese scientists have tried to explain them, saying they may be fossilized trees, however, this has yet to be proven.

Naga Fireballs

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Over the Mekong river in southeast Asia, glowing balls can sometimes be seen rising from the water and shooting high up into the air. These have become known as the naga fireballs or Mekong Lights. The balls appear to be a reddish color and vary in size from small sparks to as large as basketballs. They can even be seen rising upwards of a hundred meters before disappearing into thin air. The fireballs are most often reported during the mid-fall season at night. Some people believe that the balls are actually caused by ammunition being fired into the sky or that there is some kind of flammable gas being released by the marshy water, but no one is really sure.

Pollock Sisters

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Way back in 1957, tragedy struck the pollock family of Hexham, England when sisters Joanna, six, and Jacqueline, eleven were killed by a car while walking to church. Their parents grieved for their lost daughters and a year later Florence pollock gave birth to twins. They named the girls Jennifer and Gillian. Their parents made an odd discovery, however; baby Jennifer had the exact same birthmarks as her late sister Jacqueline. Thinking it was a coincidence, their parents didn’t think much of it until their twins got older and began requesting toys they’d never seen and to go to parks they’d never been to, but their late sisters had. Their parents soon began to suspect that their daughters were the reincarnations of their deceased sisters as there was no way, not even through science, to explain the strange coincidences.